Alzheimer's Disease

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  • Electrical Pulses to Scalp May Boost Memory: Study

    MedicineNet Alzheimer's General
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Title: Electrical Pulses to Scalp May Boost Memory: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 8/28/2014 2:36:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 8/29/2014 12:00:00 AM
  • Why Do the Deeply Forgetful Say No

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Bob DeMarco
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    Many Alzheimer's caregivers accept the word "No" from the deeply forgetful without ever trying to figure out why they do it.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading Room S/he says no all the time, the caregiver complains.It is very common for a person that is deeply forgetful to say "no" when you ask them to do something. I don't know why, but it seems like this is a secret to many in the dementia community even though this is a common occurrence.I knew for a long time when Dotty said "no" she didn't mean it. Nevertheless, it still drove me crazy, and often made me feel frustrated or…
  • Boosting Memory Through Stimulation of a Brain Network

    Alzforum News
    29 Aug 2014 | 12:42 pm
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the parietal cortex strengthens a hippocampal network involved in associative memory and transiently improves memory performance.
  • ‘A Marriage to Remember’ - NYTimes.com

    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease
    Butch
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:55 am
    ‘A Marriage to Remember’ – NYTimes.com.
  • A “Spark of Life” from Australia: Guest post from Hilary Lee

    The Myth of Alzheimers
    Danny George
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:24 am
    In 2009, while attending the Alzheimer’s Disease International meeting in Singapore, I met Hilary Lee and was greatly impressed by her presentation on the Spark of Life program she has developed. I wanted to give Hilary a chance to tell her story and share her innovative work/outcomes with our community, and she kindly prepared the [...]
 
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    Alzheimer's Reading Room

  • Why Do the Deeply Forgetful Say No

    Bob DeMarco
    1 Sep 2014 | 8:07 am
    Many Alzheimer's caregivers accept the word "No" from the deeply forgetful without ever trying to figure out why they do it.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading Room S/he says no all the time, the caregiver complains.It is very common for a person that is deeply forgetful to say "no" when you ask them to do something. I don't know why, but it seems like this is a secret to many in the dementia community even though this is a common occurrence.I knew for a long time when Dotty said "no" she didn't mean it. Nevertheless, it still drove me crazy, and often made me feel frustrated or…
  • The Secret of Getting a Person Living with Alzheimer's to Take a Bath or Shower

    Bob DeMarco
    31 Aug 2014 | 6:39 am
    One of the biggest problems I faced as an Alzheimer's caregiver was how to convince my mother she needed to take a shower. The harder I tried to convince her, the worse it became.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading Room Do you have this problem?Getting a person living with Alzheimer's or a related dementia to take a bath or shower?For me this was one of the most difficult and vexing problems I faced. To be honest, it was driving me crazy at times. Subscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail: 1. Alzheimer's and the Dreaded ShowerLet me tell you, when I get done with Dotty she looks like a…
  • Learning How to Walk Backwards in Alzheimer's Care

    Bob DeMarco
    30 Aug 2014 | 7:41 am
    As I learned to walk backwards I felt less anxious, less confused, and less and less anger. As a result, Dotty seem to do the same exact thing.My father once told me, "you make your own bed and you sleep in it." This referred to the decisions you make in life, the problems you face in life, and how you deal with the resultant circumstances.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading Room Ever tried to walk a long distance backward without looking over your shoulder? I doubt it. Go ahead, start walking around you home backwards. No looking over your shoulder, eyes straight ahead, no peeking. How do…
  • 3 Quick Questions and Answers About Alzheimer's

    Bob DeMarco
    29 Aug 2014 | 6:57 am
    Asked and answered: How Alzheimer's Works, Does Alzheimer's Cause Hallucinations?, Does Alzheimer's Cause Death?,  and how to search our knowledge base for answers to your question.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading RoomSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail: 1. How Alzheimer's WorksThe brain absorbs information, holds it in short-term memory, and then converts short-term to long-term memory. This complex process depends on the ability of neurons to communicate with each other, and is disrupted by the onset and progression of Alzheimer's.How the Loss of Memory Works in…
  • Mindfulness Training Brightens Outlook for Caregivers and People with Dementia

    Bob DeMarco
    28 Aug 2014 | 7:31 pm
    “Although they know things will likely get worse, they can learn to focus on the present, deriving enjoyment in the moment with acceptance and without excessive worry about the future.”by Marla PaulKen PallerKen Paller, a fellow of the Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer’s Disease Center, reported in a new study that mindfulness training for individuals with early-stage dementia and their caregivers was beneficial.Mindfulness training for individuals with early-stage dementia and their caregivers together in the same class was beneficial for both groups, easing depression and improving…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease

  • ‘A Marriage to Remember’ - NYTimes.com

    Butch
    26 Aug 2014 | 1:55 am
    ‘A Marriage to Remember’ – NYTimes.com.
  • Chemtrails Dr Russell Blaylock: Nutrition and the Illuminati Agenda

    alienfocus
    25 Aug 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Codex Alimentarious and Agenda 21ForbiddenKnowledgeTVAlexandra BruceAugust 25, 2014Dr. Russell Blaylock illustrates and discusses how the human population is being manipulated into violence and eventually destruction through the use of nutrition or the lack thereof. He says the nutritional manipulation and biological manipulation from national or international Pharma/Food/BioTech companies are degrading and impairing the human cognitive function and intellect. This is deliberate and strategic as in Agenda 21 or Codex Alimentarious, for the Illuminati to keep the human populace suppressed,…
  • Brett Eldredge: Man Crush Monday

    Vicki Pepper
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:00 pm
    In honor of #ManCrushMonday, every week Pepper highlights one of her favorite male country artists. Brett Eldredge introduced himself to country fans by way of a very sweet song called “Raymond,” which addressed the subject of Alzheimer’s Disease.  Released in 2010, we had to wait almost three years until Brett released his debut album Bring You Back, which included “Raymond.”   But Brett’s career really took off with his soulful, sophomore single, “Don’t Ya,” and has been helped by his subsequent releases, “Beat of the…
  • NightSide - Greg O'Brien and Dr. Molly Perdue Discuss Alzheimer's Disease

    Rob Brooks, Pr.
    25 Aug 2014 | 3:00 pm
    BOSTON (CBS) – Greg O’Brien, an award-winning journalist, was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s in 2009, at the age of 59. Having already seen his grandfather and mother go through the disease, O’Brien had more first-hand knowledge of it than most when they receive the devastating diagnosis. Staying true to his journalistic instincts, O’Brien immediately began documenting his journey, writing about an experience that few if any have been able to capture on paper. He joins Dan, along with expert Dr. Molly Perdue, to talk about this scary and often misunderstood disease.
  • How does genetics affect Dementia?

    melissalstoneburner
    25 Aug 2014 | 11:24 am
    As with many diseases, our heritage can play a big role in whether or not we get Alzheimer’s disease, AD, or any other form of Dementia. Of course a Dementia caused by a head trauma or a sports injury is not inherited, but earned (great reward isn’t it?). As it is explained on the NINDS website, several genes—most notably ApoE and the gene for tau (MAPT)—have been implicated in AD and other forms of dementia. A sad fact of the matter is that there is many a Dementia – and even some related disorders – that tend to share genetic and other characteristics of AD. Some family members…
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    The Myth of Alzheimers

  • A “Spark of Life” from Australia: Guest post from Hilary Lee

    Danny George
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:24 am
    In 2009, while attending the Alzheimer’s Disease International meeting in Singapore, I met Hilary Lee and was greatly impressed by her presentation on the Spark of Life program she has developed. I wanted to give Hilary a chance to tell her story and share her innovative work/outcomes with our community, and she kindly prepared the [...]
  • Richard Taylor on the “progress” of the Alzheimer’s national plan

    Danny George
    9 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    This post is from our friend and colleague Richard Taylor, a contributor to the blog:  There was a saying in WW II (I’ve been told) that claimed “Loose lips sink ships.” I have just read several news releases and watch ​ed​ a couple of NIH videos updating the progress of the national plan, you remember [...]
  • Alzheimer’s disease and pink slime: making sense of the Blackfriars Consensus Statement

    Danny George
    2 Jun 2014 | 2:57 pm
    The tides truly appear to be shifting in the dementia field. For several decades, the focus has largely been on studying the disease process and developing drugs to intercede in the process of amyloid formation, believed to be toxic to neurons. Those efforts have not panned out, and now clinical trials are introducing anti-amyloid treatments [...]
  • Manchester UK- a friendly community for the future

    Peter Whitehouse
    22 May 2014 | 1:46 am
      Just finished visit to Manchester, the first official age-friendly city in the UK which also has a legacy of being the first modern industrial city. Our host were many including Chris Phillipson of MICRA at the University of Manchester, Alistair Burns, National Clinical Director of dementia at the NHS, and John Keady of DART, [...]
  • What’s normal? The politics of psychiatric labeling

    Danny George
    6 May 2014 | 6:32 am
    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) was released almost one year ago. In its wake, a national debate has waged about the expanding boundaries of mental illness, and the process through which the DSM comes to adjudicate its categories. Peter and I recently authored a piece on the website Open Democracy [...]
 
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    White Oak Cottages

  • Caring at Home: How to Find Help Part II: Adult Day Care

    Heather Sawitsky
    17 Aug 2014 | 7:28 pm
    When seeking support for dementia care, an alternative to home care is an adult day care program.   An adult day program runs 5 days a week, 7 to 8 hours Read More...
  • Caring at Home: How to Find Help: Part I Home Care

    Heather Sawitsky
    10 Aug 2014 | 6:37 pm
      Anyone caring for someone with dementia needs a lot of support.  As a patient’s needs expand, it is not uncommon for the primary caregiver to fall ill from the stress and exertion required.  Bringing help into the home can alleviate caregiver burnout.  But it takes time and Read More...
  • Check Out the Choosing Wisely® Campaign

    Heather Sawitsky
    3 Aug 2014 | 7:12 pm
    There is a new tool available to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about medical treatment. It is the Choosing Wisely® campaign. The idea for this program came from Howard Read More...
  • Is Alzheimer’s Increasing or Decreasing Globally?

    Heather Sawitsky
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:54 pm
    There was some confusing news announced at the Annual Alzheimer’s International Conference about the number of cases of Alzheimer’s around the world. First, the good news. Two separate studies reported a Read More...
  • Eye Tests: More Screening Tools to Identify People at Risk for Alzheimer’s

    Heather Sawitsky
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:43 am
    Credit: Official U.S. Navy Page Two clinical trials that use eye screening to detect early build up of amyloid in the brain were reviewed at the 2014 Alzheimer’s International Conference. Like the Read More...
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