Alzheimer's Disease

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  • Regular, Moderate Coffee Drinking Tied to Better Brain Health in Seniors

    MedicineNet Alzheimer's General
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:00 am
    Title: Regular, Moderate Coffee Drinking Tied to Better Brain Health in SeniorsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/31/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/3/2015 12:00:00 AM
  • Expectations of the Person with Alzheimer's

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Carole Larkin
    4 Aug 2015 | 4:59 am
    We base our expectations on abilities and capabilities that they had in the past, and now, may no longer have in the present.One of the definitions of the word expectation is: a standard of conduct or performance expected by or of someone.We all have expectations of other individuals based upon the demeanor and behavior that they have shown us in the past. Yet, in day to day caregiving of a person with Alzheimer’s or another dementia, having expectations of that person can be either a blessing or a curse, and frequently both blessing and curse. How to Get The Answers to Your Questions About…
  • Massive Mouse Study Bolsters Rationale for Combination Therapy

    Alzforum News
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:55 pm
    Dose permutations point to synergistic effects on Aβ and amyloid plaques
  • Night Blindness

    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease
    Laurie Buchanan
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:08 am
    You may have seen the video of neuroscientist and sleep author, Penelope Lewis, discussing the link
  • Probate as a Dirty Word — Part I

    AgeRight.org
    Margaret A. Hoag, J.D.
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:47 am
    I am asked on a regular basis, “What does probate mean?”  or “Doesn’t a will avoid probate?”  It is easy to forget that what seems obvious to a lawyer is not necessarily obvious to our clients.  In this post and the next, I will attempt to provide a simple explanation for probate and why it has such a bad reputation.  There are also a number of words I will define along the way. A History Lesson Probate means “to prove” in Latin.  Lawyers today often talk about “proving” a will.  You may be interested to know that the practice of…
 
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    Alzheimer's Reading Room

  • Expectations of the Person with Alzheimer's

    Carole Larkin
    4 Aug 2015 | 4:59 am
    We base our expectations on abilities and capabilities that they had in the past, and now, may no longer have in the present.One of the definitions of the word expectation is: a standard of conduct or performance expected by or of someone.We all have expectations of other individuals based upon the demeanor and behavior that they have shown us in the past. Yet, in day to day caregiving of a person with Alzheimer’s or another dementia, having expectations of that person can be either a blessing or a curse, and frequently both blessing and curse. How to Get The Answers to Your Questions About…
  • Why is it so hard to understand that a person living with dementia forgets?

    Bob DeMarco
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:03 am
    Do we really understand that persons living with dementia are deeply forgetful?If so, why do we complain and become so frustrated when they ask us the same question over and over; or, when they ask us for something (a person, place) that no longer exists?Once I started thinking of my mother as deeply forgetful; rather than, as a person afflicted with dementia it really changed my perspective on forgetfulness.We tend to view a person living with Alzheimer's or a related dementia as less than a "whole person". This is not true, or even close to being true. Persons living with dementia have…
  • 3 Ways to End the Dementia Care Blame Game

    Bob DeMarco
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:36 am
    By Bob DeMarco Alzheimer's Reading Room A simple question. Are persons afflicted with dementia inherently mean?The answer is no, and studies prove it.In spite of this you will hear caregivers, especially those who are new to the game, complaining (sometimes referred to as venting) over and over about the same thing.What can you do?Look for patterns of bad behavior, and when they are happening.Establish a daily routine.Introduce activities into your day that keep dementia patients occupied.How to Get Answers To Your Questions About Alzheimer's and Dementia Join22,911 people who subscribeto the…
  • Richard Taylor on the Dementia Patient as Backward Child

    Bob DeMarco
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:49 am
    We lock persons living with the symptoms of dementia into a straight jacket from which there is no chance of emotional nor intellectual development (will they ever experience anything new and joy filled in their lives, can they?). Alzheimer's Reading Room In order to understand Richard Taylor's comment which I am publishing below, you will first need to read Elaine Pereira's article -- Is the Progression of Decline in Alzheimer’s Patients the Reverse of Infant Development?For those of you who are not familiar with Richard he lives with dementia, has a PhD,  and is the author of the…
  • 10 Ways to Improve Dementia Care and Quality of Life

    Bob DeMarco
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:42 am
    The Alzheimer's Reading Room offers an extensive knowledge base, and provides information that focuses on improving the quality of life for caregivers and those afflicted with Alzheimer's and dementia.The Alzheimer's Reading Room has over 5,100 articles. We started publishing daily in July, 2009, and every day since then.We have articles from some of the smartest and most experienced people you will ever meet in the Alzheimer's community. In total our writers, authors and scientists have over 500 years of experience. The best way to find information and solutions to caregiver problems is…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease

  • Night Blindness

    Laurie Buchanan
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:08 am
    You may have seen the video of neuroscientist and sleep author, Penelope Lewis, discussing the link
  • Stage 7 of Alzheimer's - The Race is Won

    RJ Thesman
    4 Aug 2015 | 3:00 am
    As told by Reverend G … How long will it take before I die? Day after day and night after long night when I often don’t sleep – I watch for the light. It creeps under the doorway when everything is quiet in the hallways. Then it flirts with the window in the corner of my room as it changes from the mere beginnings of another day into the full-blown afternoon and then again – the silence of evening. People come into my room and do things to me. They change my sheets and my clothes. They make me feel clean again. They help me go to the bathroom. I wish they didn’t have to do that, but…
  • Cognitive tests can help predict risk of Alzheimer’s disease 18 years before symptoms appear

    Malavika Srikanth
    3 Aug 2015 | 9:04 pm
    http://bit.ly/1hgFqII Occasional forgetfulness and disorientation, leading to progressive memory loss and personality changes are characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This neurodegenerative disorder can neither be reversed nor cured. It affects nearly 44 million people worldwide and around 1% of the world’s GDP is spent on caring for patients affected by AD. Research funding for studying the biological basis of this disease has seen a huge increase over the last 30 years. Yet, many key questions remain unanswered, such as why this disease cannot be cured and why it progresses at…
  • That's a good bingo!

    maljohn2
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:49 pm
    That’s a good bingo! On Wednesday afternoons at the long-term care facility where my mother lived, you will find me in the community hall (or according to my mother – the big mall where people sing) volunteering at bingo. I go with an open mind and an open heart. Every week I learn something new from my peeps at the residence. (My sister calls them my “peeps” and I like that so I use the term often.) The gifts that they give me are many and I cherish them. If you want to meet people who are truly authentic…then visit a long-term care facility. Even those who have…
  • Takes me right back to grad school

    luysii
    3 Aug 2015 | 6:06 pm
    How many times in grad school did you or your friends come up with a good idea, only to see it appear in the literature a few months later by someone who’d been working on it for much longer. We’d console ourselves with the knowledge that at least we were thinking well and move on. Exactly that happened to what I thought was an original idea in my last post — e.g. that Gemfibrozil (Lopid) might slow down (or even treat) Alzheimer’s disease. I considered the post the most significant one I’d ever written, and didn’t post anything else for a week or two, so…
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    AgeRight.org

  • Probate as a Dirty Word — Part I

    Margaret A. Hoag, J.D.
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:47 am
    I am asked on a regular basis, “What does probate mean?”  or “Doesn’t a will avoid probate?”  It is easy to forget that what seems obvious to a lawyer is not necessarily obvious to our clients.  In this post and the next, I will attempt to provide a simple explanation for probate and why it has such a bad reputation.  There are also a number of words I will define along the way. A History Lesson Probate means “to prove” in Latin.  Lawyers today often talk about “proving” a will.  You may be interested to know that the practice of…
  • I Think I Am Ready to Move, What’s Next?

    Dawn Stevens
    21 Jul 2015 | 9:10 am
    You love your home but the thought of impending summer yard work and another snowstorm-ridden New England winter has you itching to get out. Ask yourself these questions: Is this house too big and expensive to maintain? Could I live more comfortably somewhere else? Would moving somewhere else be more financially affordable for me? Do I feel isolated? Do I need help with chores around the house: Yard work? Errands? Regular maintenance? Can I easily get to doctors appointments, the grocery store, etc.? Do I need help with preparing my meals? Are paying my bills and keeping my finances straight…
  • Traditional Mediterranean Cheese

    Oldways
    14 Jul 2015 | 1:00 pm
    Before chocolate, before bread, and before butter, there was cheese. There is evidence of cheesemaking at cow and sheep dairies in ancient Mesopotamia (c. 7000 B.C.E.), cheese remnants in an ancient Egyptian tomb (c. 3000 B.C.E.), and cheese trade in ancient Rome and Greece. Cheese was a source of protein and other nutrients that helped these civilizations make it through the winter months. Today, cheese is still an important part of the Mediterranean diet. When we talk about cheese, we mean traditional cheese, cheese that is made from milk, natural cultures and not much more. Today, there…
  • 7 Things to Look For on Your Assisted Living Tour

    Bob Larkin
    7 Jul 2015 | 10:27 am
    As we say in the Assisted Living industry, “When you’ve seen one assisted living community, you’ve seen just one.” They come in all different shapes and sizes, and offer a variety of features, amenities and prices. That’s why it is important to take a tour to see personally if it’s “the right fit” for you or your loved one. Here Are The 7 Top Things To Look For And “Feel” On Your Tour: Is the community attractive? Is the décor attractive and homelike? Does the community have good natural and interior lighting? Is there a nice outdoor space? Do you like the apartments? Can…
  • FAQ: Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST)

    Margaret A. Hoag, J.D.
    24 Jun 2015 | 7:42 am
    MOLST stands for Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment.  In some states, they call these orders POLST for Physician’s Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment.   Generally speaking, MOLST is a document which gives medical orders about life-sustaining treatment for patients with an advanced illness.  MOLST is not intended for use by healthy people. MOLST is new in Massachusetts.  The government authorized MOLST in 2008 and the Executive Office of Health and Human Services has been testing it since then.  In 2012 the EOHHS began expanding the use of MOLST and in 2014 the…
 
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    White Oak Cottages

  • Benefits of Mediterranean Cooking

    Heather Sawitsky
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:36 am
    In the past few years, people have claimed a number of foods to have protective properties that guard against the onset of dementia. Most of these claims have not held up to scientific study. A notable exception is Read More...
  • Results from the International Alzheimer’s Conference

    Heather Sawitsky
    26 Jul 2015 | 6:38 pm
      The Alzheimer’s Association holds an annual international conference that brings together researchers from around the world to discuss developments in Alzheimer’s research. This year’s conference just ended. Here is a brief overview of what Read More...
  • Namenda in a Generic Form

    Heather Sawitsky
    19 Jul 2015 | 9:07 am
      Namenda is designed to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s, especially when paired with donezepil, the generic form of Aricept®. It has been Read More...
  • White House Conference on Aging Is on Monday

    Heather Sawitsky
    10 Jul 2015 | 8:28 am
      Since 1961, the White House has sponsored a once-a-decade gathering designed to evaluate where we are as a nation in addressing the current and projected needs of older Americans. In the past, the White House Read More...
  • Summer Reading for Middle Schoolers

    Heather Sawitsky
    5 Jul 2015 | 8:55 pm
      The goal of most adolescents is to fit in with their peers, even if nursing aspirations that  will set them apart from everyone else.  But when a parent or grandparent has Alzheimer’s disease, young family Read More...
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    InnovAge

  • Failure to Communicate

    InnovAge
    30 Jul 2015 | 7:00 am
    “What we’ve got here is failure to communicate:” The last thing you want hear when you’re a patient. InnovAge’s Dr. Mary Tuuk explores the importance of communication in Today’s Geriatric Medicine magazine: “We have more options than ever to help… Continue reading →
  • Potbellied-pigs Waddle with Love

    InnovAge
    29 Jul 2015 | 7:28 am
    Wednesday Wellness: Potbellied-pig duo Boris and Pumba call on Alzheimer’s disease patients for laughs, love, therapy.Filed under: Aging Tagged: Aging, Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, InnovAge, Pot-bellied Pig, Therapy
  • Nursing Homes Costs Skyrocket, Adult Day Program Alternative

    InnovAge
    23 Jul 2015 | 7:33 am
    Nursing homes are an expensive—starting at approximately $84,000 a year—for those who need services. But we’ve found many older adults may not need the intensive services provided by a nursing home. For example, only 10% of the older adults who… Continue reading →
  • Albuquerque Crusin’ Big Dogs Take it to the Hoop!

    InnovAge
    22 Jul 2015 | 7:03 am
    Watch these Albuquerque women–the Albuquerque Crusin’ Big Dogs–take it to the hoop! They just won Gold at the National Senior Games​!  Filed under: Aging Tagged: Aging, Aging Well, Albuquerque, Basketball, Excercise, Hoops, National Senior Games, New Mexico, Sports
  • Older Adults and Mental Illness: Assessment and Approach

    InnovAge
    16 Jul 2015 | 7:02 am
    Older adults, like the rest of the population, often suffer from mental health challenges. The CDC says about 20% of older adults have a mental health concerns. The first step in getting older adults help is a mental health assessment,… Continue reading →
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    Alzheimer's Disease: The Brand - Follow the story blog

  • The Prescient Clues of an  Improbable Diagnosis

    3 Aug 2015 | 11:04 am
    The impact of social determinants of health and psychosocial factors such as education and physical activity on Alzheimer's disease and dementia have been discussed in the literature. Here are a few contextualized reports from the Alzheimers Association International Conference. I encourage you to comment, subscribe, or just start to question the data being peddled as fact and scientific advancement. Not all data is the same...Early education impacts future risk for Alzheimer’s diseaseTwo studies from Sweden presented at AAIC 2015 suggest a correlation between childhood school…
  • Dementia in the 1800s: the psychiatrist, the letter and the painter

    26 Jul 2015 | 9:43 am
    Emile-Antoine Blanche is described as the preeminent psychiatrist of his day. The handwritten letter below was discovered in the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University (by me). My goal has been to gather letters or manuscripts that pre-date Auguste Deter's arrival at the Frankfurt Asylum where she was posthumously assigned the eponymous diagnosis--Alzheimer's Disease. The video below (in french) is an interesting find as Frederic Mitterrand, nephew of former President of France, Francois Mitterand, is commenting about Antoine…
  • AAIC: holding out for a hero?

    20 Jul 2015 | 12:42 pm
    One pill that will prevent a multitude of interdependent biologic processes contributing to senescence or Alzheimer's Disease? Monoclonal antibodies that neutralize "clumps" of proteins? Reversing advanced disease in mice--and hoping to duplicate in humans? A virus attacking plaques in the brain? Pardon me if I am not applauding the latest findings being reported from Alzheimers Association International Conference (AAIC) but hearing about drugs "sucking out proteins" or dose changes of previously effective but toxic drugs doesn't hold up sustained hope. Especially when the focus is on…
  • How to Be a Punk Analyst...Question Everything.

    18 Jul 2015 | 1:51 pm
    There is a lot of bad data drifting around the medical research space. Many of you forward suspicious media headlines and claims captured by news outlets. My goal is to turn all of you into punk rockers. Question everything, raise hell, and hold everyone accountable. Pretty much sounds like a parallel set of skills aligned with data analysts or anyone that looks to data when creating a narrative or story. I even wrote a small book to answer the FAQs about finding medical data to analyze. A recent continuing medical education executive was surpised that so much relevant data is floating around…
  • A puzzle without an answer...

    14 Jul 2015 | 1:18 pm
    Even if I adjust for the White House factor and the amazing opportunity to hear the President address attendees of this once in a decade event--it was spectacular. I blogged about the daily logistics here.Walking out of the White House complex after the conference I was hopeful. A day spent discussing social determinants of health, supporting caregivers, and strengthening our commitment to aging with dignity hit the right notes. The analogy of an orchestra was pulled through morning discussions and into the final moments of the day. Like musicians, our efforts measure up beyond individual…
 
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