Alzheimer's Disease

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  • Did you ever ask your loved one living with Dementia where they went to first grade?

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Bob DeMarco
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:34 am
    I did and much to my surprise my mother answered without hesitation - Saint Monica's.I had this conversation with my mother in 2010. To put this in context, Dotty first attended Saint Monica's in 1922. At the time of the conversation she was 93 years old; and, in the moderate to severe stage of Alzheimer's.To learn more about this episode go to this article - I Had to Remind Myself - My Mom Was Deeply Forgetful- and look for the story about half way down the page.By Bob DeMarco +Alzheimer's Reading Room I'm writing this article because I have been asked several times recently -How do you talk…
  • 7 Alzheimer's Disease Stages and Symptoms

    MedicineNet Alzheimer's General
    4 Sep 2015 | 12:00 am
    Title: 7 Alzheimer's Disease Stages and Symptoms Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 7/30/2014 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/4/2015 12:00:00 AM
  • Grief and the Emotional Evolution of the Alzheimer’s Caregiver

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Bob DeMarco
    4 Sep 2015 | 6:50 am
    As I reviewed descriptions of the stages of grief, I realized that Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers may go through them as well.Elisabeth Kübler-Ross was the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying, in which she laid out her theory of the five stages of grief.They are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.JOIN More Than23,316 members of the Alzheimer's communityEmail: By Marie MarleyAlzheimer's Reading Room As I reviewed descriptions of the stages, I realized that Alzheimer’s caregivers may go through them as well. I realized that having a loved one living…
  • ALS Protein Said to Liquefy, Then Freeze en Route to Disease

    Alzforum News
    4 Sep 2015 | 2:43 pm
    The protein FUS forms liquid organelles in healthy cells. Does it trigger neurodegeneration by switching to a solid state?
  • Birthday Traditions: Remembering and Establishing

    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease
    Regan
    4 Sep 2015 | 8:29 pm
    My father and I share September as our birthday month. Our actual birthdays are just two days apart. He will turn 72 this year, but I’m not sure he will remember. His memory betrays him more often than not any more; he suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease like his mother before him. I don’t know if my father had any birthday traditions growing up. He was the last of six children in a household that struggled to make ends meet. I don’t know if there were birthday presents, parties, or cake. Perhaps I won’t ever know, now. When I was growing up we would often have…
 
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    Alzheimer's Reading Room

  • Grief and the Emotional Evolution of the Alzheimer’s Caregiver

    Bob DeMarco
    4 Sep 2015 | 6:50 am
    As I reviewed descriptions of the stages of grief, I realized that Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers may go through them as well.Elisabeth Kübler-Ross was the author of the groundbreaking book On Death and Dying, in which she laid out her theory of the five stages of grief.They are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance.JOIN More Than23,316 members of the Alzheimer's communityEmail: By Marie MarleyAlzheimer's Reading Room As I reviewed descriptions of the stages, I realized that Alzheimer’s caregivers may go through them as well. I realized that having a loved one living…
  • Accepting Repetitive Alzheimer's Behavior as the New Normal

    Bob DeMarco
    3 Sep 2015 | 6:32 am
    It was only after I finally understood that the behaviors my mother was engaging in were normal for a person living with Alzheimer's disease that I was able to finally accept Alzheimer's.I contemplated the problem for years.I was trying to come up with a good answer to a question I get frequently --how can you stop a person that has Alzheimer's disease from asking the same question over and over? How can you stop a person living with Alzheimer's disease from engaging in the same behaviors over and over?Help me.Learn More - 10 Things a Person Living with Dementia Would Tell You If They CouldBy…
  • Why People with Dementia Switch Back to the Past

    Bob DeMarco
    2 Sep 2015 | 11:03 am
    I just finished reading an interesting article - Passage of time: why people with dementia switch back to the past - that I think you will find of interest.You can learn from the article and it might clear up some of the issues you are facing while caring for someone living with dementia.Excerpts from the article.How to best respond?Rather than trying to bring the person with dementia back to reality, families and carers may try to enter their reality; building trust and empathy, and reducing anxiety. This is known as validation therapy but many families and carers will practise this…
  • Is There Life After Caregiving, What is it Like?

    Bob DeMarco
    2 Sep 2015 | 4:34 am
    I found myself thinking about the aftermath of caregiving, and what life would be like in the months and years ahead.Judith Graham is one of my favorite writers and journalist. Every time I read an article by her I think the same thing - I wish I could write like Judith.Judith recently wrote two articles about life after caregiving which begins with After the Caregiving Ends on The New Old Age (New York Times).Judith has a wonderful way of fleshing out a story and pulling it together. Her writing is deep but easy to read and understand.Excerpt.In January, the 93-year-old mother of my oldest…
  • Did you ever ask your loved one living with Dementia where they went to first grade?

    Bob DeMarco
    1 Sep 2015 | 9:34 am
    I did and much to my surprise my mother answered without hesitation - Saint Monica's.I had this conversation with my mother in 2010. To put this in context, Dotty first attended Saint Monica's in 1922. At the time of the conversation she was 93 years old; and, in the moderate to severe stage of Alzheimer's.To learn more about this episode go to this article - I Had to Remind Myself - My Mom Was Deeply Forgetful- and look for the story about half way down the page.By Bob DeMarco +Alzheimer's Reading Room I'm writing this article because I have been asked several times recently -How do you talk…
 
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    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease

  • Birthday Traditions: Remembering and Establishing

    Regan
    4 Sep 2015 | 8:29 pm
    My father and I share September as our birthday month. Our actual birthdays are just two days apart. He will turn 72 this year, but I’m not sure he will remember. His memory betrays him more often than not any more; he suffers from Alzheimer’s Disease like his mother before him. I don’t know if my father had any birthday traditions growing up. He was the last of six children in a household that struggled to make ends meet. I don’t know if there were birthday presents, parties, or cake. Perhaps I won’t ever know, now. When I was growing up we would often have…
  • Why I am not eating chocolate this month

    Lizzie
    4 Sep 2015 | 11:19 am
    Last month the world Alzheimer’s report for 2015 was published, and it makes for pretty grim reading. The world Alzheimer’s report reviews the literature for the year, and looks at things like the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease, looks for any patterns and trends we have noticed over the year and also looks at the economic and social cost. You can read the full report and a summary of the report here http://www.alz.co.uk/research/world-report-2015, or you can look at the highlights in this really great infographic…
  • Shrinking

    dragonmisery
    4 Sep 2015 | 6:57 am
    Over the past 6 months mum’s decline has become more noticeable, particularly to those who don’t see her all the time.  It’s as though she’s shrinking, not only in height (she’s now the same height as me, whereas she was always significantly taller), but it’s as though she is slowly shrinking into herself. It almost feels to me as though she was once a lovely oil painting, and gradually the colour and layers have slipped away, till she was a line drawing – now those lines are fading too. It’s a terrible way to describe someone you care for, but that really is how it feels to…
  • Use of Gene therapy to rescue dying cells in the brains of Alzheimer's patients- Clinical study

    Laxmi Iyer
    4 Sep 2015 | 2:03 am
    http://bit.ly/1NQNltI Alzheimer’s disease (AD) affects approximately 50 million people worldwide and is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders affecting elderly people. This number is expected to double in the next 20years especially in the developing world. AD is a progressive disease which manifests in the form of dementia, i.e. memory loss and loss of other intellectual abilities, serious enough to hinder day-day activities. Several approaches involving huge amounts of time, effort and money have been invested to treat the disease or to slow down its progression but none…
  • Remembering Grandpa: The Disease that Took Him Away

    Sammi Coppedge
    4 Sep 2015 | 1:45 am
    My grandpa was always that person who would talk your ear off for hours about essentially nothing. He was a Korea/Vietnam veteran, and probably the most proud at that. Growing up, I couldn’t even tell you how many army stories he rambled on to me about. It wasn’t just me either. He would talk to anyone who would listen. I’ll never forget the time he ordered me and my cousins pizzas and then spent what felt like forever on the front porch telling the delivery man all about his war days. We used to joke that the poor guy probably got fired for taking too long with the…
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    The Myth of Alzheimers

  • Intergenerational Schools achieves more recognition locally, nationally, and internationally

    Peter Whitehouse
    13 Aug 2015 | 7:24 am
            From left to right are Yachneet Pushkarna (VP Global Strategy, Intergenerational Schools International, Cathy Whitehouse and Peter Whitehouse at Generations United confernece in Honolulu,  July 2015. During July several organizations recognized our intergenerational schools for their high performance. Locally of the top five performing public elementary schools in Cleveland,  two were [...]
  • Remembering a great spirit – Richard Taylor PhD

    Peter Whitehouse
    6 Aug 2015 | 10:16 am
          The world lost at great human being on July 25th when Richard Taylor PhD passed. He died in the loving embrace of his wife Linda and children . As the family said in their announcement: “As I (son Jason) am sure most of you know Richard had this amazing power of reaching [...]
  • A beautiful moment of intergenerativity in the NBA Finals

    Danny George
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:36 am
    Like most Clevelanders, I am watching our Cavaliers play the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals with rapt attention. Every minute of each game has been tension-filled, and, even from afar, one can feel the collective excitement growing in Cleveland – a city that hasn’t experienced a championship since the Cleveland Browns won the [...]
  • Rethinking CNS drug discovery: What can we learn from successes in oncology? guest post by Hamish McDougall with commentary

    Peter Whitehouse
    8 Jun 2015 | 8:12 am
      Today we have another guest post from UK-based Hamish McDougall, a knowledgable analysis of the Alzheimer’s drug development space and all around pleasant chap. I felt a few introductory comments were warranted. The comparison between cancer (uncontrolled cell growth) and “Alzheimer’s” (uncontrolled cell death) is apt. Some have hypothesized  defects in the same biological [...]
  • Alzheimer’s Association Trajectory Model labeled irresponsible again

    Peter Whitehouse
    31 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    We have reported on the blog earlier that the Alzheimer’s Association Changing Trajectory report imagines that a magic bullet will appear by 2015 and that the report projects cost savings by the drug being free and universally available. The local chapter in Cleveland will be featuring the report at their annual meeting on June 16th. [...]
 
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    AgeRight.org

  • “MIND” Diet and Mediterranean Diet: Similar Foods, Similar Brain Benefits

    Oldways
    27 Aug 2015 | 6:14 am
    The link between healthy aging and the Mediterranean diet is well established, but recent research is putting a new name on this traditional, brain healthy cuisine. A July 2015 study in Alzheimer’s & Dementia reported that older adults on the “MIND diet” could delay cognitive aging by up to 7.5 years. The MIND diet, which emphasizes specific foods known to support brain health, includes whole grains, leafy green vegetables, berries, nuts, olive oil, and fish. Sound familiar? The ‘M’ in MIND Diet stands for Mediterranean. In fact, the MIND diet is actually a hybrid of the…
  • Probate as a Dirty Word — Part 2

    Margaret A. Hoag, J.D.
    25 Aug 2015 | 11:52 am
    In Part One, I discussed the process of probate.  In Part Two, I will talk about avoiding probate and why it is a dirty word. When a person dies, he or she usually owns a variety of different types of assets.  Real estate, life insurance, bank accounts, etc.  The family needs to figure out who will inherit these various assets now that the original owner is dead.  The original owner can tell us whom he or she intended to inherit these assets in a number of ways: by naming a joint owner on the asset by naming a beneficiary of the asset by placing the assets into a trust by leaving a…
  • Discovering Your Senior Housing Options

    Dawn Stevens
    18 Aug 2015 | 9:18 am
    So you’ve just celebrated your 55th birthday. Whether a move is in your near future or several decades down the road, it makes sense to have a solid understanding of senior housing options. Defining the Terms Today’s senior has several housing options to fit their lifestyle, budget and healthcare needs. More options are great, but it can also be overwhelming. Listed below are the differences between senior housing options available. 55+ Communities* 55+ communities are great for active seniors who want resort style amenities along with excellent social options. They are restricted to…
  • Why are Seniors Healthier & Happier in Assisted Living?

    Bob Larkin
    11 Aug 2015 | 1:18 pm
    There are four major reasons: Companionship, Independence and Home-Like Surroundings: Assisted Living encourages companionship and a sense of independence in a place that feels like home. Residents have their own private apartments they can furnish and decorate however they choose. Every day is filled with choices from which activities they want to participate in to the favorite dish they want to have for lunch. Good friends, a strong sense of self-worth and comfort are the best medicines of all. Personal Wellness Care: We have professional nurses and a trained staff to supervise and assist…
  • Let’s Go Nuts!

    Oldways
    4 Aug 2015 | 1:07 pm
    Lately, it seems like people are going crazy for nuts: there are endless varieties of nut snacks, butters, milks, oils and flours at the grocery store, and nuts are popping up in all kinds of dishes, from salads to dessert. For good reason! Nuts are delicious, healthy, and add unique flavors and textures to meals. They can also be an important source of protein, especially for those following plant-based diets. Food and Culture: Nuts have been an important source of protein in the Mediterranean diet for thousands of years. Nuts native to the temperate climate of the Mediterranean region…
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    White Oak Cottages

  • ALS Research May Benefit Alzheimer’s Patients

    Heather Sawitsky
    23 Aug 2015 | 9:28 am
      The success of the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge has been the envy of many charities. Now it appears that ALS research, having been revitalized by the flow of $220 million from the Challenge, may lead to better understanding of other neurological diseases as well, including Alzheimer’s. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Read More...
  • Richard Taylor, Author of Alzheimer’s from the Inside Out

    Heather Sawitsky
    16 Aug 2015 | 7:58 pm
    When Richard Taylor was 61, his doctor informed him that he had dementia, “probably of the Alzheimer’s type.” By his own account, he, his family and friends “ran as fast as we could down the first hundred steps Read More...
  • Benefits of Mediterranean Cooking

    Heather Sawitsky
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:36 am
    In the past few years, people have claimed a number of foods to have protective properties that guard against the onset of dementia. Most of these claims have not held up to scientific study. A notable exception is Read More...
  • Results from the International Alzheimer’s Conference

    Heather Sawitsky
    26 Jul 2015 | 6:38 pm
      The Alzheimer’s Association holds an annual international conference that brings together researchers from around the world to discuss developments in Alzheimer’s research. This year’s conference just ended. Here is a brief overview of what Read More...
  • Namenda in a Generic Form

    Heather Sawitsky
    19 Jul 2015 | 9:07 am
      Namenda is designed to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s, especially when paired with donezepil, the generic form of Aricept®. It has been Read More...
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    InnovAge

  • Exoskeleton Helps You Feel Old

    InnovAge
    3 Sep 2015 | 7:26 am
    Most of us have no idea what it feels like to be old. This exoskeleton gives you the opportunity. Would you try it?  Filed under: Aging Tagged: Activity, Aging, Exercise, Exoskeleton, InnovAge, Walking
  • Like a Rolling Stone

    InnovAge
    2 Sep 2015 | 7:31 am
    Keith Richards. 71. ‘Nuff said! Filed under: Aging Tagged: Aging, Keith Richards, Music, Rock, Rolling Stones
  • How Maureen’s Situation Led Her to Help Others

    InnovAge
    27 Aug 2015 | 7:20 am
    It’s tough to share your own caregiver experience. It’s heartbreaking and uplifting. It’s the hardest work and the most rewarding. It’s emotional. That’s why we’re so grateful InnovAge’s President and CEO Maureen Hewitt shared her story.    Filed under: Aging, Care… Continue reading →
  • People with Alzheimer’s Love Life? You Bet!

    InnovAge
    26 Aug 2015 | 7:10 am
    We feel this is something we’ve known all along: people with Alzheimer’s enjoy life. Just last week we had a luau at the InnovAge Johnson Adult Day Program, for people with Alzheimer’s. And everyone had a great time.Filed under: Alzheimer's… Continue reading →
  • Caregivers Provide $450B Free Care

    InnovAge
    20 Aug 2015 | 7:05 am
    Did you know caregivers provide approximately $450 billion in free care to friends and family each year? This care coordination ranges from buying groceries to arranging doctor appointments to medical care. InnovAge’s Epi Mazzei, RN, and Chief Medical Officer Dr.… Continue reading →
 
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    Alzheimer's Disease: The Brand - Follow the story blog

  • Better patient outcomes? Ask better questions...

    29 Aug 2015 | 12:45 pm
    “The good physician treats the disease; the great physician treats the patient who has the disease.” To be able to treat the patient, a physician must ask the right questions and know how to act on the answers. I am procrastinating but not really. I am preparing a presentation for participation in a patient outcomes panel in a few weeks. I am not a slide person but that seems to freak out meeting organizers. Many wait in anticipation of presentation slides and are not particularly satisfied when I only have 2 or 3. I am more of an "in the moment"…
  • Sharing the Alzheimer's narrative, one story at a time

    22 Aug 2015 | 3:49 pm
    This weekend I started writing about the differentially expressed gene variants up-regulated and down-regulated in late onset alzheimer's disease (LOAD) and early onset alzheimer's disease (EOAD). My goal is to communicate genetic and environmental risk information to a broader audience. If our communities and eventually societies are well-versed in the science behind diseases--specifically Alzheimer's--we can begin to demand effective allocation of research dollars and governmental intervention for the development of a societal infrastructure to improve social determinants of health.A 2015…
  • Your brain on microbiota, lessons in optimal neurologic health

    13 Aug 2015 | 1:52 pm
    Follow the story from The People's Pharmacy, Bowel Bacteria as a Source of Inflammation:Inflammation is the driver behind many chronic conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, psoriasis and others. But where is the inflammation coming from? Perhaps our standard American diet plays a role.It turns out that we can influence the ecology of our microbiota by what we feed it. Find out what foods can help calm inflammation, and how this affects neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism or multiple sclerosis.David Perlmutter, MD, FACN, ABIHM, is a…
  • Let's focus more on the data, and less on the donut...

    8 Aug 2015 | 8:57 pm
    My dad had Alzheimer's disease. My family bore witness to the limitations of managing an aging parent with AD as we quietly wondered if our final years would be less tarnished--more golden. The rush to identify diagnostic biomarkers for early treatment or cures that haven't materialized seems counterproductive or at least aspirant. There is real data that suggests meaningful correlations between social determinants of health and risk of chronic diseases in old age such as diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. I would like to see more research focused here for the societal benefit as well as…
  • Mindmapping a Story About The Mind: Alzheimer's Disease

    7 Aug 2015 | 6:32 pm
    There is a great deal of information to review and capture. I am using mind mapping software and a cool free app that I recently discovered here. I tend to think cinematically and not linearly so this helps me to stay organized but pull in all ideas as they happen. It is definitely a work in progress but I like where it is going...
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