Alzheimer's Disease

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  • Memory, Thinking Tests May Hint at Alzheimer's Risk

    MedicineNet Alzheimer's General
    25 Jun 2015 | 12:00 am
    Title: Memory, Thinking Tests May Hint at Alzheimer's RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 6/24/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/25/2015 12:00:00 AM
  • The Role of Palliative Care and Artificial Feeding in Dementia Care

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Bob DeMarco
    3 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses like Alzheimer's disease. Palliative care focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. Palliative is a form of end of life care.The goal of  palliative care is to improve the quality of life for patients, caregivers and families.Unfortunately, while the situation is improving, palliative care needs of patients with dementia are sometimes poorly addressed. Symptoms such as pain are sometimes under treated; and, patients are often subjected to burdensome…
  • Familial Alzheimer’s Gene Alters Children’s Brains

    Alzforum News
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:21 pm
    In children as young as 9 who carry a presenilin 1 mutation, researchers detect subtle functional and structural brain changes.
  • ~FIN~ goodbye Mom

    "Had a Dad" Alzheimer's Blog
    GBP })i({
    13 Jun 2015 | 12:46 pm
    My mom died June 7, 2015.  Her cancer had briefly gotten a bit better in April around her 70th birthday, but then it came "roaring" (per oncologist) back over just a week, while she was undergoing chemotherapy.  The last month of her life, she couldn't eat anymore and threw up constantly.  The cancer strangled her digestive system, effectively shutting it off.She fainted on Memorial Day, falling and breaking her jaw and several of her teeth.  She came home from the hospital after that on TPN, IV nutrition.  An old friend of mine agreed to take my mom's elderly dog for…
  • Novel DNA repair mechanism brings new horizons

    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease
    Dr. Jekyll
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:05 pm
    Estimated structure of the nucleosomal DNA loops, which are temporarily formed during transcription
 
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    Alzheimer's Reading Room

  • The Role of Palliative Care and Artificial Feeding in Dementia Care

    Bob DeMarco
    3 Jul 2015 | 7:40 am
    Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses like Alzheimer's disease. Palliative care focuses on providing patients with relief from the symptoms and stress of a serious illness. Palliative is a form of end of life care.The goal of  palliative care is to improve the quality of life for patients, caregivers and families.Unfortunately, while the situation is improving, palliative care needs of patients with dementia are sometimes poorly addressed. Symptoms such as pain are sometimes under treated; and, patients are often subjected to burdensome…
  • 5 Tips For People Choosing Long Term Dementia Care

    Bob DeMarco
    2 Jul 2015 | 5:59 am
    Experience has taught me that family caregivers have a lot of questions when they choose long term dementia care for the loved ones.Experience has also taught me that there is plenty to know ahead of time—and plenty of tips that will help caregivers make a dementia care community move as simple as possible.The Best Way to Find Solutions to the Problems that Alzheimer's Caregivers Face Each DayBy Rachael Wonderlin Alzheimer's Reading Room1. Label your loved one’s items—especially their clothesHaving worked in long-term dementia community care, I can tell you first-hand that residents’…
  • How the Loss of Memory Works in Alzheimer’s Patients

    Bob DeMarco
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:34 am
    Carole Larkin wrote an important article about memory loss in persons living with Alzheimer's and dementia - How the Loss of Memory Works in Alzheimer’s, and How Understanding This Could Help You. I wanted to bring this article to the attention of the many thousands of subscribers that have come on board since it was last published.Understanding how memory works is hard to do. It is essential to know and learn how memory works and how it affects the brain if you want to deal effectively with a person suffering from dementia.Carole points out that long term memory is still intact. The…
  • Do Women Have A Higher Risk Of Alzheimer's ?

    Bob DeMarco
    30 Jun 2015 | 6:29 am
    The statistics show that nearly two thirds of people living with Alzheimer's disease are women.Can the numbers be explained by the simple fact that women live longer? Or are other factors in play?The most interesting aspect of the graph above is that women lead in each of the age categories - 65, 75, 85.The Best Way to Find Solutions to the Problems that Alzheimer's Caregivers Face Each DayAlzheimer's Reading RoomWhat puts women at greater risk?Can it be attributed to genetics?Can differing biological factors in how women age be the reason?Could differences in lifestyle be a cause?Stanford…
  • Can you spot Alzheimer's and dementia 18 years before diagnosis?

    Bob DeMarco
    29 Jun 2015 | 7:13 am
    A new study is suggesting that early symptoms of Alzheimer’s appear up to 18 years before the disease is officially diagnosed.My mother, Dotty, would have been 99 years old today.The research summary presented below really caught my attention. Why? Because I have often wished that I knew about my mother's impending Alzheimer's disease sooner.Why? Because I believe it could be possible to delay the onset of Alzheimer's. The key word is delay, I am not saying prevent.It really is very simple. If a drug were to come on the market that delayed the onset of Alzheimer's by five years,  the…
 
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    "Had a Dad" Alzheimer's Blog

  • ~FIN~ goodbye Mom

    GBP })i({
    13 Jun 2015 | 12:46 pm
    My mom died June 7, 2015.  Her cancer had briefly gotten a bit better in April around her 70th birthday, but then it came "roaring" (per oncologist) back over just a week, while she was undergoing chemotherapy.  The last month of her life, she couldn't eat anymore and threw up constantly.  The cancer strangled her digestive system, effectively shutting it off.She fainted on Memorial Day, falling and breaking her jaw and several of her teeth.  She came home from the hospital after that on TPN, IV nutrition.  An old friend of mine agreed to take my mom's elderly dog for…
  • Dementia on Pinterest

    GBP })i({
    23 Nov 2014 | 3:45 pm
    I'll be posting interesting things about dementia and Alzheimer's on Pinterest.  See the sideboard or below.  "Had a Dad" Alzheimer's Blog http://alzheimersdad.blogspot.com (c) Gevera Bert Piedmont })i({ Thank you for visiting!
  • My mom has cancer

    GBP })i({
    24 Oct 2014 | 5:50 pm
    My mom has stage-4 ovarian cancer.  I have no time to devote to this blog as it's taking all I have, and more, to give her the care she needs.  She's not terminal at this point; the doctor believes she can live 5 years, but she first has to survive chemo, surgery, and more chemo, which is going to be a battle into next spring. I will never take down these pages as long as I believe that my dad's story helps others.  He's been gone almost 7 years and I miss him every day, but I'm glad he's not here to see my mom so very ill.Hug your parents and tell them you love them. If…
  • "stand your ground" follow-up

    GBP })i({
    1 Mar 2014 | 12:28 pm
    Back in December, I wrote about the sad case where an elderly Alzheimer's patient was shot to death under the "stand your ground" law, which allows you to shoot basically anyone you feel like shooting if you can claim you are threatened.To quickly recap, Mr Ronald Westbrook was wandering at night with his dog, lost, and went to the wrong house.  The people called the police, but then also went outside and shot the old man, killing him.Now the DA has decided that this sort of behavior is perfectly acceptable and no charges are to be filed against the cowardly young man who was afraid of…
  • Look at Them Swim

    GBP })i({
    6 Feb 2014 | 11:48 am
    This is the essay I submitted to Chicken Soup for the Dementia Soul.  I did not hear back from them, and the book comes out on 4/22/2014, and you're supposed to hear back two months before.  So here it is for your enjoyment, and  you don't have to buy the book.Look at Them SwimDementia is a terrible disease and as it progresses, most days are filled with incidents we’d rather forget.  But every once in a while, there are brief moments of joy and laughter.My dad had Alzheimer’s for four years, and his first symptoms were speech-related (aphasia).  As the disease…
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    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease

  • Novel DNA repair mechanism brings new horizons

    Dr. Jekyll
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:05 pm
    Estimated structure of the nucleosomal DNA loops, which are temporarily formed during transcription
  • Let Her Have the Bush

    alzwife
    3 Jul 2015 | 1:05 pm
    We live in a bucolic neighborhood of 19th century homes and well tended gardens. We bought our house from three elderly maiden sisters who had some peculiar ideas. One of them was to tear out the gorgeous old growth azaleas and replace them with bushes that would fit right into a Dr. Suess landscape.  We are not gardeners. In fact, I would rather clean a toilet than weed, but I had casually expressed the opinion that one of the bushes would flower if only it were properly pruned. I then promptly left town on a business trip. While I was gone, our daughter L came home and saw J wielding an…
  • Treating People with Dementia is Treating my Depression.

    viviennemercy
    3 Jul 2015 | 11:11 am
    When I was growing up all old people eventually couldn’t remember their children’s names. Oh she’s just getting a little senile.  The jargon’s changed and now they emphasise the fact that even though it’s so common, dementia is unnatural. It needs to be treated, medicated and fought. So I’m a nurse. I work in a dementia specific unit. People ask me if it’s sad. “What do you mean sad?” I’d say “Well. Working with people with dementia. It’s sad, right?” And they look at me questionably when I blurt out “fuck…
  • Weekly Neuroscience Update

    Editor
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:33 am
    Reductions in cortical surface area and increases in cortical thickness in Down syndrome relative to
  • Omega-3 supplements and antioxidants can be beneficial to some people facing Alzheimer's disease

    liangbil
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:54 pm
    Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology says that here’s more evidence that fish oil supplementation and antioxidants might be beneficial for at least some people facing Alzheimer’s disease: A new report describes the findings of a very small study in which people with mild clinical impairment, such as those in the very early stages of the disease, saw clearance of the hallmark amyloid-beta protein and reduced inflammation in neurological tissues. To make their discovery, Fiala and colleagues investigated the effects of 4 to 17 months of supplementation with…
 
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    The Myth of Alzheimers

  • A beautiful moment of intergenerativity in the NBA Finals

    Danny George
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:36 am
    Like most Clevelanders, I am watching our Cavaliers play the Golden State Warriors in the NBA Finals with rapt attention. Every minute of each game has been tension-filled, and, even from afar, one can feel the collective excitement growing in Cleveland – a city that hasn’t experienced a championship since the Cleveland Browns won the [...]
  • Rethinking CNS drug discovery: What can we learn from successes in oncology? guest post by Hamish McDougall with commentary

    Peter Whitehouse
    8 Jun 2015 | 8:12 am
      Today we have another guest post from UK-based Hamish McDougall, a knowledgable analysis of the Alzheimer’s drug development space and all around pleasant chap. I felt a few introductory comments were warranted. The comparison between cancer (uncontrolled cell growth) and “Alzheimer’s” (uncontrolled cell death) is apt. Some have hypothesized  defects in the same biological [...]
  • Alzheimer’s Association Trajectory Model labeled irresponsible again

    Peter Whitehouse
    31 May 2015 | 8:37 am
    We have reported on the blog earlier that the Alzheimer’s Association Changing Trajectory report imagines that a magic bullet will appear by 2015 and that the report projects cost savings by the drug being free and universally available. The local chapter in Cleveland will be featuring the report at their annual meeting on June 16th. [...]
  • Whitehouse at White House (Conference on Aging regional event) help April 27, 2015 in Cleveland

    Peter Whitehouse
    13 May 2015 | 7:36 am
          Here is the five minute talk I gave and the one photo I showed:   As an AARP visiting scholar, White House Conference on Aging groupie and fan of global health innovation (event held at Global Center for Health Innovation), let me thank all that made this program possible.  I’ll explain this [...]
  • WHO Dementia Summit – care today, care tomorrow, cure sometime maybe never, prevention yes

    Peter Whitehouse
    30 Mar 2015 | 8:55 am
      Congratulations to Margaret Chen, Shekar Saxena, Tarun Dua and all the staff of WHO as well as OECD for a fantastic first ministerial WHO Dementia Summit held in Geneva March 17 and 18th.  Over 86 countries, all WHO regions, 45 NGOs and 50 academic and foundations were represented. I was officially listed as representing [...]
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    AgeRight.org

  • FAQ: Medical Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (MOLST)

    Margaret A. Hoag, J.D.
    24 Jun 2015 | 7:42 am
    MOLST stands for Medical Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment.  In some states, they call these orders POLST for Physician’s Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment.   Generally speaking, MOLST is a document which gives medical orders about life-sustaining treatment for patients with an advanced illness.  MOLST is not intended for use by healthy people. MOLST is new in Massachusetts.  The government authorized MOLST in 2008 and the Executive Office of Health and Human Services has been testing it since then.  In 2012 the EOHHS began expanding the use of MOLST and in 2014 the…
  • HOPE for the Present and A Cure for the Future

    Dr. Robert A. Stern
    17 Jun 2015 | 7:35 am
    Providing HOPE is one of many goals of the Boston University Alzheimer’s Disease Center (BU ADC). We hope to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease and inspire others to believe that there is hope in finding a cure. Without research participation, the BU ADC could not perform its cutting-edge research that is so desperately needed to cure Alzheimer’s and help those with the disease. HOPE is also an acronym for the main registry for participants in the BU ADC. HOPE stands for Health Outreach Program for the Elderly. People who join HOPE attend a yearly visit in which their memory and…
  • Everyone is Suddenly Talking about Death – and That’s a Good Thing

    Nancy Crowley, RN, BS
    11 Jun 2015 | 8:06 am
    We know that people are increasingly less satisfied with the typical end of life care available in the US and that people DO want to take a more active role in the process. A recent study in the Journal of Palliative Medicine showed that in 2000, 56.7% of 622 respondents rated end of life care as excellent, but a decade later only 47% of 586 people could say the same. A 2012 survey by the California Healthcare Foundation reported that 80% of people said that if they were seriously ill, they would want to talk to their doctor about advance care planning, yet only 7% reported having had this…
  • 11 Frequently Asked Questions About Paying for Assisted Living

    Bob Larkin
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:40 am
    A well informed consumer is more likely to investigate the real value of their purchase or investment. To make an educated decision when it comes to senior living, it is important to understand the terminology and expectations in order to put things into perspective. This list of frequently asked questions related to paying for assisted living can help you to better understand your needs, properly compare communities, and ultimately help you find the residence that is right for you. 1. How much does Assisted Living cost per month? The cost of assisted living can vary widely but is, at the…
  • Everybody Needs a Break, Especially Those Who Care for Others

    Michelle Boiardi
    8 Jun 2015 | 1:23 pm
    Almost 20 percent of all adults provide unpaid care to a family member or friend who is age 50 or older. Most of these caregivers are caring for a spouse or are the adult children caring for a parent. These caregivers are doing everything from grocery shopping and errands to preparing meals and managing finances. As a loved one’s health declines, often they assist with the basic activities of daily living like getting dressed, showering, going to the bathroom and eating, most often because of confusion, forgetfulness, or diagnosed Alzheimer’s disease. As caregivers take on these…
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    White Oak Cottages

  • Summer Reading with Young Children

    Heather Sawitsky
    30 Jun 2015 | 7:07 am
      Summer is the time when many children spend time with their grandparents. It is a time when, if a grandparent has Alzheimer’s, children will become aware of cognitive changes and have many questions. One way Read More...
  • Remembering Our Fathers

    Heather Sawitsky
    20 Jun 2015 | 8:38 pm
      Jonathan Kozol wrote a reflection about his father in Saturday’s Boston Globe that is well worth the read. He describes the steady losses that Alzheimer’s disease took on his father, a renowned neuropsychiatrist. Any of us who have watched a parent decline with a dementing disease will identify with Read More...
  • Complexities of Health Care Proxies Part II

    Heather Sawitsky
    15 Jun 2015 | 3:58 am
      Congratulations if you have designated a health care proxy. But don’t think that you are finished with the difficult work of end of life planning. The Theoretical Versus The Actual Most of us  will sign health Read More...
  • The Complexities of Health Care Proxies – Part I

    Heather Sawitsky
    8 Jun 2015 | 4:47 am
      There is a push to encourage everyone to sign a health care proxy. For good reason. Medicine is increasingly able to prolong life, but not always quality life.  Over treatment and under treatment concerns Read More...
  • Alzheimer’s Patients Score Major Victory in Namenda Lawsuit

    Heather Sawitsky
    26 May 2015 | 4:48 am
    On Friday afternoon, the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit affirmed an injunction against Actavis, the pharmaceutical company that manufactures Namenda®. Namenda is prescribed to those with Read More...
 
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    blog.myinnovage.org

  • Get Rid of the Guilt: Take Care of Yourself and Your Loved One

    InnovAge
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:47 am
    If you’re a caregiver, we’re not telling you something you don’t already know…you have a very stressful job! Many caregivers—regardless of age—don’t realize they’ve signed up for a more-than-full-time, 24-hour-a-day job. You already know you need to take time for… Continue reading →
  • Wednesday Wellness: Have Great Fourth of July with Loved One

    InnovAge
    1 Jul 2015 | 7:36 am
    Some good tips for a successful Fourth of July with an elderly loved one.Filed under: Aging Tagged: Aging, Aging Well, Elderly, Fireworks, Fourth of July
  • Are You Part of the Sandwich Generation?

    InnovAge
    25 Jun 2015 | 7:34 am
    We all love a tasty sandwich! However the Sandwich Generation is anything but. This Sandwich is a complex mix of adult children caring for their children and their aging parents.                    … Continue reading →
  • Wednesday Wellness: Women Artists Coming Into Their Own in Their 70s

    InnovAge
    24 Jun 2015 | 8:08 am
    You’ve likely noticed by now we love art whether it’s “urban” or, in this case, “fine.” Today we’d like to introduce you to 11 women in their 70s-90s who continue to create. Artist Carmen Herrera This blog is for informational… Continue reading →
  • Keep Your Memory Sharp with Exercise, Hobbies

    InnovAge
    20 Jun 2015 | 8:50 am
    A couple of the best and most enjoyable ways to keep your memory sharp is through exercise and hobbies that stimulate your mind. Keep your brain active.   This blog is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to… Continue reading →
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    Alzheimer's Disease: The Brand - Follow the story blog

  • Preventable but not curable. Are we ready for a new paradigm?

    2 Jul 2015 | 11:38 am
    My story is similiar to Alanna's bravely shared below. Only now do I recall the "Alzheimer's Association" purple hued room as I listened to my father's voice on the other end of the phone. The dining room in our rented bungalow was painted a vibrant purple. Just beginning our married life together, my husband originally committed to paint the room a subtle color but over time it became our favorite characteristic of the small home. My dad was speaking quite matter of factly and if not for the atypical nature of an unprecedented call there was nothing out of the ordinary--at first. He…
  • What do we know about the "normal" aging brain?

    25 Jun 2015 | 6:49 am
    A recent article in JAMA, Prevalence of Cerebral Amyloid Pathology in Persons Without Dementia examined patient level data  for 2914 participants with normal cognition, 697 with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI,) and 3972 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) aged 18 to 100 years from 55 studies. Normal cognition was defined as normal scores on cognitive tests, the absence of cognitive complaints for which medical help was sought, or both. Subjective cognitive impairment was defined as presence of a cognitive complaint with presentationat a health care…
  • The Funnel of Discovery and Risks to Society

    23 Jun 2015 | 5:24 am
    There are many drugs (statins here and benzodiazepines here) linking side effects to diminished cognitive ability and dementia. Most of us are familiar with statin use for managing high cholesterol although clear direction regarding  which populations and at what intensity continue to evolve. Benzodiazepines are prescribed for anxiety, nervousness, panic disorders, sleeplessness, a lot of the symptoms you might expect to see when managing elderly patients where non-pharmacologic treatment options are not prioritized. Over medicalization of the elderly highlights the importance of…
  • Breaking AD news: disease modification or attenuation of symptoms? Waiting for data...

    15 Jun 2015 | 10:35 am
    If you have been following the somewhat dismal Alzheimer's disease clinical trial results you may also be a little curious about a recent uptick in positivity surrounding the upcoming Alzheimer's Association International Conference (AAIC). Thank you to friend Stuart for snapping the photo!The experimental drug, solanezumab, an injectable humanized monoclonal IgG1 antibody directed against Aβ peptides, is garnering a lot of attention for it's potential disease modifying effects  for patients at risk of Alzheimer's disease. Current treatments may modify…
  • Primer on Neuroplasticity by BigThink...

    12 Jun 2015 | 8:59 am
    I spent quite a bit of time enjoying this infographic created by Alta Mira Drug and Rehab facility. I appreciate how understanding of neuroplasticity depends on unlocking the science of brain research and what we actually know. Take some time to read through the images and head on over to Big Think for the actual article. One example of a recent discovery with major implications is our further understanding of neuroplasticity. Simply put, we used to think our brain was what it was — unchangeable, unalterable. We were stuck with what nature gave us. In actuality, our brains are like…
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