Alzheimer's Disease

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  • Certain Antipsychotic Meds Tied to Kidney Problems in Elderly

    MedicineNet Alzheimer's General
    20 Aug 2014 | 12:00 am
    Title: Certain Antipsychotic Meds Tied to Kidney Problems in ElderlyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 8/19/2014 12:35:00 PMLast Editorial Review: 8/20/2014 12:00:00 AM
  • We Are Constrained By Our Own Brains

    Alzheimer's Reading Room
    Bob DeMarco
    22 Aug 2014 | 11:35 am
    We the caregivers have a tendency to give up, or to stop trying. Our brains tells us - we can't do it. Our own brains can be our biggest enemy when it comes to effective, loving, caring.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading RoomI read Elaine Pereira's article, Christmas Memories Past and Present, with great interest.In her own words Elaine wrote:"I especially recall my mom's bizarre, dementia induced behaviors of Christmas Day 2009".She then went on to describe a series of unsettling behaviors when her mother started rummaging aimlessly through her handbag.This immediately sent me back to one…
  • Mislocalized Mitochondria Sufficient for Motor Neuron Malaise

    Alzforum News
    22 Aug 2014 | 2:47 pm
    Perfectly healthy mitochondria can sicken neurons simply by being in the wrong place.
  • Can mom live alone? One family’s struggle with Alzheimer’s - Health and Medicine - The Sacramento Bee

    WordPress Tag: Alzheimers Disease
    Butch
    16 Aug 2014 | 12:42 pm
    Can mom live alone? One family’s struggle with Alzheimer’s – Health and Medicine – The Sacramento Bee.
  • A “Spark of Life” from Australia: Guest post from Hilary Lee

    The Myth of Alzheimers
    Danny George
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:24 am
    In 2009, while attending the Alzheimer’s Disease International meeting in Singapore, I met Hilary Lee and was greatly impressed by her presentation on the Spark of Life program she has developed. I wanted to give Hilary a chance to tell her story and share her innovative work/outcomes with our community, and she kindly prepared the [...]
 
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    Alzheimer's Reading Room

  • We Are Constrained By Our Own Brains

    Bob DeMarco
    22 Aug 2014 | 11:35 am
    We the caregivers have a tendency to give up, or to stop trying. Our brains tells us - we can't do it. Our own brains can be our biggest enemy when it comes to effective, loving, caring.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading RoomI read Elaine Pereira's article, Christmas Memories Past and Present, with great interest.In her own words Elaine wrote:"I especially recall my mom's bizarre, dementia induced behaviors of Christmas Day 2009".She then went on to describe a series of unsettling behaviors when her mother started rummaging aimlessly through her handbag.This immediately sent me back to one…
  • 4 Lessons I Learned as an Alzheimer's Caregiver

    Bob DeMarco
    22 Aug 2014 | 8:08 am
    I learned that people living with Alzheimer's or a related dementia are not the enemy, they are our loved one's.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading RoomMy name is Bob DeMarco and I am an Alzheimer's caregiver. I took care of my mother for 8 and a half years until the day she went to Heaven on May 25, 2012.As it turned out it was a long and arduous journey. A journey that started with fear and great burden; and ended, with feelings of great accomplishment and Joy.Caring for my mother in her greatest time of need was the greatest accomplishment of my life. I know that other caregivers come to…
  • The Front Row

    Bob DeMarco
    22 Aug 2014 | 7:18 am
    Knowing that the day is coming when your loved one -- won't know you-- is the most horrific feeling of them all for an Alzheimer's caregiver.By Bob De Marco Alzheimer's Reading RoomAre Alzheimer's Caregivers the Forgotten?I often use the term "living Alzheimer's from the front row". This term describes caregivers that watch Alzheimer's take its course 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Once Alzheimer's disease strikes, Alzheimer's caregivers get to witness the craziness that comes with Alzheimer's day in and day out. If you think it is disconcerting to see someone suffering from Alzheimer's…
  • Love Remembered Despite Alzheimer’s

    Bob DeMarco
    21 Aug 2014 | 7:44 am
    I was stunned. He didn't realize that I was the woman in the photo.By Marie Marley Alzheimer's Reading Room Here’s a true story that illustrates that people with Alzheimer’s can remember and experience strong emotions related to a past event even if they can’t remember the facts surrounding the occasion.I had a beautiful, relaxed drive to visit Ed, my beloved Romanian soul mate of 30 years, at the nursing home one lazy Sunday afternoon. I wandered into his room and found he was in the bathroom, so I sat in the rocker and waited. My eyes were drawn, as was often the case, to his stuffed…
  • Alzheimer's Robbed Us of Our Ability to Communicate

    Bob DeMarco
    20 Aug 2014 | 5:56 am
    Our communication and the way we related to each other changed - abruptly, over night. It was as if our ability to communicate effectively had been robbed from us.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomI knew and understood the changes that were being caused by Alzheimer's disease. On the other hand, my mother couldn't see the change. She couldn't understand what was happening.When my mother would say something mean, or act out crazy behavior, I experienced the same emotions that most Alzheimer's caregivers experience -- anger, frustration, and agitation.Over the course of my life I had…
 
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    The Myth of Alzheimers

  • A “Spark of Life” from Australia: Guest post from Hilary Lee

    Danny George
    5 Aug 2014 | 8:24 am
    In 2009, while attending the Alzheimer’s Disease International meeting in Singapore, I met Hilary Lee and was greatly impressed by her presentation on the Spark of Life program she has developed. I wanted to give Hilary a chance to tell her story and share her innovative work/outcomes with our community, and she kindly prepared the [...]
  • Richard Taylor on the “progress” of the Alzheimer’s national plan

    Danny George
    9 Jul 2014 | 10:26 am
    This post is from our friend and colleague Richard Taylor, a contributor to the blog:  There was a saying in WW II (I’ve been told) that claimed “Loose lips sink ships.” I have just read several news releases and watch ​ed​ a couple of NIH videos updating the progress of the national plan, you remember [...]
  • Alzheimer’s disease and pink slime: making sense of the Blackfriars Consensus Statement

    Danny George
    2 Jun 2014 | 2:57 pm
    The tides truly appear to be shifting in the dementia field. For several decades, the focus has largely been on studying the disease process and developing drugs to intercede in the process of amyloid formation, believed to be toxic to neurons. Those efforts have not panned out, and now clinical trials are introducing anti-amyloid treatments [...]
  • Manchester UK- a friendly community for the future

    Peter Whitehouse
    22 May 2014 | 1:46 am
      Just finished visit to Manchester, the first official age-friendly city in the UK which also has a legacy of being the first modern industrial city. Our host were many including Chris Phillipson of MICRA at the University of Manchester, Alistair Burns, National Clinical Director of dementia at the NHS, and John Keady of DART, [...]
  • What’s normal? The politics of psychiatric labeling

    Danny George
    6 May 2014 | 6:32 am
    The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) was released almost one year ago. In its wake, a national debate has waged about the expanding boundaries of mental illness, and the process through which the DSM comes to adjudicate its categories. Peter and I recently authored a piece on the website Open Democracy [...]
 
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    The Zen of Caregiving

  • Guest Blog: "How To Express Your Condolences" by Suzie Holber

    Lynne Taetzsch
    4 Aug 2014 | 10:38 am
    Expressing Your Condolences to Distant Family Members With social media, email and other online options, it is easy to stay in touch with people you may not see very often. This can include distant family members that live in another state. They may also be family that you never knew well when growing up so you didn't have the opportunity to become close. However, you may have connected online and because of this, hear about a death in the family. Expressing Your Sympathies It can be difficult to know what to say in this instance. You are related to the person and have been in contact…
  • Being a Caregiver Taught Me That I Was Stronger Than I Thought

    Lynne Taetzsch
    15 Jul 2013 | 8:15 am
    Guest Blog by Cameron Von St. James In November of 2005, my wife, Heather, learned that she had malignant pleural mesothelioma.  When we learned about her disease, I became her primary caregiver.  Instead of preparing for our three-month-old daughter's first Christmas, our lives soon fell apart as we began down a difficult road to save Heather’s life.   My role as caregiver began before we left the doctor's office.  The doctor told us that my wife would have to see a specialist for her cancer, and he gave us three options.  My wife was unable to make a decision, too…
  • Listen to this Song to Help Raise Money for Alzheimer's

    Lynne Taetzsch
    25 Aug 2012 | 2:00 pm
    Liz Queler has recorded this song to help raise money for Alzheimer's, which has afflicted her father.  It's a great song and a worthy cause, as any of us know who have had loved ones with the disease.  Please watch it:  Hallelujah (sing for the hope) - song for Alzheimer's.
  • Watch this Video on Alzheimer's

    Lynne Taetzsch
    23 Jul 2012 | 10:05 am
    I am still hearing from people even though I've stopped updating this blog.  Someone recently sent me the link to a video that is very powerful.  I hope you'll watch it:  One Thing You Don't Want to Forget. It is over a year since Adrian died, and I am going on with my life, but I think about him every day.  It feels strange to be going through each day without him.  People say I'm doing well, and I guess I am, but it doesn't change the loss.
  • Hospicare Helps Us at the End of Life

    Lynne Taetzsch
    6 Jun 2011 | 11:29 am
    Adrian died on May 24, 2011 at home.  He died peacefully without pain, thanks to Hospicare.  Once this wonderful organization took charge, I felt that we were cradled in their arms.  They were available 24/7, guided us on pain medication, talked to doctors so that we didn't have to, and provided whatever we needed such as oxygen, hospital bed, air mattress, etc.  I will be going to bereavement support groups sponsored by Hospicare, and they have counselors available to me as well.  In every way, they support us at the end of life, caring for the dying as well as the family left…
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    White Oak Cottages

  • Caring at Home: How to Find Help Part II: Adult Day Care

    Heather Sawitsky
    17 Aug 2014 | 7:28 pm
    When seeking support for dementia care, an alternative to home care is an adult day care program.   An adult day program runs 5 days a week, 7 to 8 hours Read More...
  • Caring at Home: How to Find Help: Part I Home Care

    Heather Sawitsky
    10 Aug 2014 | 6:37 pm
      Anyone caring for someone with dementia needs a lot of support.  As a patient’s needs expand, it is not uncommon for the primary caregiver to fall ill from the stress and exertion required.  Bringing help into the home can alleviate caregiver burnout.  But it takes time and Read More...
  • Check Out the Choosing Wisely® Campaign

    Heather Sawitsky
    3 Aug 2014 | 7:12 pm
    There is a new tool available to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about medical treatment. It is the Choosing Wisely® campaign. The idea for this program came from Howard Read More...
  • Is Alzheimer’s Increasing or Decreasing Globally?

    Heather Sawitsky
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:54 pm
    There was some confusing news announced at the Annual Alzheimer’s International Conference about the number of cases of Alzheimer’s around the world. First, the good news. Two separate studies reported a Read More...
  • Eye Tests: More Screening Tools to Identify People at Risk for Alzheimer’s

    Heather Sawitsky
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:43 am
    Credit: Official U.S. Navy Page Two clinical trials that use eye screening to detect early build up of amyloid in the brain were reviewed at the 2014 Alzheimer’s International Conference. Like the Read More...
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